Category Archives: Dive training

Is cave diving for me?

You can think of cave diving as very demanding  and more dangerous than reef diving, but when executed properly, cave dives are safe and extremely rewarding. After completing your cave diver training, you will travel to amazing places such as Bahamas islands and the Cenotes of Yucatan in Mexico, discover places only few people  have ever seen and get a sense of exploration.

CAVE DIVINGTo become a cave diver you will have to go through rigourous training. The steps and levels can slightly differ from one training agency to the other, but your training will strongly depend on the instructors experience in cave diving and teaching. So make sure you get the right instructor for yourself.

Here are a few thoughts…

Can I become a cave diver?

First of all you need the right motivation: an interest for cave and for cave diving. If you’re a thrill seeker: pass your way!

TDI Cave diving course

Any Open water diver with sufficient experience and habilities can start a cave diving training program. You should be confident diving in low-light and low visibility conditions. You should be qualified or comfortable learning in a two-tanks system, either in sidemount or backmount configuration.

Cave diving demands a serious and confident approach, and discipline to meticulously conduct every dive, every time.

What will I learn during my cave diver training?

Air Sharing in Touch Contact

 

  • Anti silting swimming techniques
  • Use a line and reel
  • Stress management
  • Dealing with problems safely and calmly
  • Become an aware and safe cave diver
  • Geology, cave formations and conservation
  • a lot more…
What equipment will I need?
  • Two tanks configuration: sidemount or backmount
  • Three torches (Primary light source and two backups)
  • Line cutters
  • Reels and spools
  • Personal markers

Make sure to talk to your instructor before purchasing any item, to ensure that you’re getting the right gear.

Where can I learn to cavern dive?

Cenote Kukulkan, cavern dive in the winter morning light

First step of the full cave diver training, you should do your training in a cave diving area, to get real experience, and inspire you to continue your training to cave diver. The Cenotes of Mexico in the Yucatan Peninsula offer amazing training and diving sites, and remain one of the most popular cave diving destination in the world.

Where can I learn to cave dive?

The cave diver training is a two step course. During the first part, the introductory course you will learn to complete simple cave dives following a single continuous guideline.

The final part of cave training is mainly about adding complexity to navigation inside the cave. For that last part of the training we highly recommend the caves of Mexico. These very complex systems offer a large quantity of dive sites and scenarios possibility for training. The warm water and shallow caves will enable you to stay longer underwater, practice and focus on cave related skills.

Where can I cave dive after my cave diver training?

All around the world 🙂

Among popular places to go cave diving for pleasure is Florida, Bahamas, Dominican Republic, France, and the Yucatan Peninsula.

Do you feel ready to become a cave diver?

We might or might not be the right instructors for you, but if you have any doubts or questions don’t hesitate in contacting us.

Most of all, if you are ready, welcome to the amazing world of cave divers.

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Cavern diving in the Cenotes of Yucatan

Discover the Cenotes of Yucatan Mexico underwater

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The Cenotes of Yucatan offers to divers the possibility to experience a unique type of dive: cavern diving in the Cenotes.

Diving in Cenote will give you a hint of what cave diving looks like in case you are yet undecided to become a cave diver or just want to enjoy the experience once.

What is a cenote?

The word “Cenote” comes from the Mayan “dzonot”. Cenotes are sinkholes created by the collapse of the limestone rocks, filled with crystal clear water.

The Yucatan penninsula is covered with Cenotes. They are found almost everywhere, some remain undiscovered deep in the jungle and others are right in the center of cities and villages. Furthermore they can have all sizes and shapes, some have underwater passages, some offer large pools while others are vertical pits. The Maya considered the Cenotes were sacred doors.

Diving in the Cenotes of Yucatan

Diving in the Cenotes is an exciting experience. You will enjoy the best diving conditions you can imagine. The water is crystal clear and the visibility is incredible, there is very little current and the water is warm all year around (25°C/76F). The underwater caves feature lots of speleothems (stalactites, stalagmites, columns, flowstones…) and stunning sunrays penetrating the darkness of the cave through small openings in the ceiling.

What certification is needed to dive in a Cenotes?

To discover the cavern part of the Cenotes on most sites you will only need an Open Water certification or equivalent, good buoyancy skills and a great level of comfort.

And if you want to go further you will need to get cave diving training and your guide can give you all the necessaries informations.

Formations of the Cenotes

These unique formations are due to a sequence of geological and climatic events. Several million years ago, the Yucatan penninsula was submerged by the ocean and arrised during the glaciation period, when the sea level drops.

Cenotes are formed by dissolution of rock creating a void bellow the bedrock  and the subsequent collapse. These collapses occur during periods when the water table is below the ceiling of the void, since the rock ceiling is no longer buoyantly supported by the water.

What are speleothems?

Speleothems are cave formations resulting from mineral deposits. They take various forms, depending on whether the water drips, seeps, condenses, flows, or ponds. The most known speleothems are:
• Stalactites: hanging from the cave ceiling
• Stalagmites: the “ground-up” counterparts of stalactites
• Column: when stalactites and stalagmites meet or when stalactites reach the floor of the cave
• Drapery, curtain or bacon are thin sheets of calcite hanging downward
• Flowstone: covering floor and walls of a cave
• Soda straws: very thin but long stalactites having an elongated cylindrical shape

You will observe all of these mineral formations and many more in cenotes.

What is the halocline?

A halocline is a type of chemocline caused by a strong, vertical salinity gradient within a body of water. Because salinity (along with temperature) affects the density of water, it plays a role in its vertical stratification. In Cenotes, you will discover this very characteristic and fascinating phenomenon of Haloclines. And you will observe it particularly cleary in Tajma Ha Cenote and Eden Cenote.

The phenomenon is very visual and the demarcation between fresh water and salt water is very clear. In the presence of a halocline, when ascending from the salt water layer (below) to the fresh water the diver can have the feeling of floating in air over water.

In which Cenotes can we do cavern diving?

Cavern diving

Here is a list of the most reknown cenotes in the Riviera Maya. There are many more to be discovered and for the most adventurous divers wanting to experience new dive sites consider a trip to the Cenotes Yucatan around Mérida  and add the culture and the culinary experience to your diving.

The Pit

Depth: 40 meters/ 120 feet
Difficulty: Difficult

The Pit is one of the deepest Cenotes of Yucatan (130 meters) and is part of one of the biggest cave system in the world. You will enjoy the amazing light beams going all the way down to the sulfide layer at 30m.

Taj Ma Ha

Depth: 15 meters/ 50feet
Difficulty: Moderate

The Cenote Tajma ha is located 5 km south of Puerto aventuras. A fairly demanding dive due to the multiple depth changes, you will be rewarded by the stunning beauty. You will observe lots of stalactites, stalagmites and fossils, 3 other Cenotes on the way with amazing light effects and come accross the halocline a few times.

Cenote Angelita

Depth: 40 meters/ 120 feet
Difficulty: Difficult

AngelitaThe Cenote Angelita is one of the deepest cenote in the Riviera Maya. It is particularly known for its sulfuide layer looking like an underground river flowing around a small island whith a few trees. Under the cloud, you will experience total darkness. This is an exceptional dive full of sensations and is for experienced divers only.

Cenote Car Wash

Depth: 16 meters/ 50 feet
Difficulty: Easy

Cavern diving course : first steps into the world of cave diving

Aktun Ha better known as Car Wash is located near Tulum. Its name come from the fact that people used to come to this cenote to wash their cars. In summer the open water pool is covered by a thick and dense layer of algae bloom whith very reduced visibility. Below this layer the water is crystal clear with subtle green brightness. You will meet turtles, fish and possibly a small crocodile. And you will enjoy the amazing beauty of the water lilis.

Cenote Chac Mool and Kukulcan

Depth: 14 meters / 50 feet
Difficulty: Easy

Cenote Kukulkan, cavern dive in the winter morning light
Cenote Kukulkan, cavern dive in the winter morning light

The Chac Mool Cavern Line leads you through a large well lit Cavern Zone with very impressive breakdown formations and spectacular views of the jungle from underwater. You will see tree roots growing down into the water along the edge of Main Entrance and dive a hypnotic halocline passage.
Halfway through the dive you can surface in a beautifully decorated air dome before continuing on through a cathedral of speleothems.

Cenote Kukulkan offers in winter one of the most amazing light show you can imagine.

Cenote Eden

Depth: 15 meters/ 50 feet
Difficulty: Easy

The Cenote Eden also known as Ponderosa features beautiful light effects and a wonderful halocline. In the open water pool you will observe many colorful fishes.

Chikin Ha

Depth: 15 meters / 50 feet
Difficulty: Easy

Cenote Chikin Ha - Map of the cavern dive
Cenote Chikin Ha – Map of the cavern dive

Chikin Ha means “Western Water”  it is a very large half moon cenote with crystal clear water.

The permanent guideline begins in the open water of Chikin Ha and traverses over to Cenote Arcoiris (Cenote Rainbow) through a large halocline tunnel. On the way back to Chikin Ha you will see fossils, crystal formations and speleothems.

Dos Ojos

Depth: 9 meters / 30 feet
Difficulty: easy

Dos Ojos is probably one of the most known Cenote dive thanks to the I-max movie “Amazing Caves”. The cenote offers two different dives,  the Barbie Line, a circuit with massive columns and stalactites. The Batcave Line is more like a dark cave as you swim around an air bell with very little light entry. All along you will enjoy the variety of its delicate formations.

Pet Cemetry

Depth: 7 meters / 30 feet
Difficulty: Moderate

As the name suggests, you will see along your dive, at the bottom, some animal skeletons. And above all this is not even the hit of these dives! This cave is amazingly decorated with white speleothems. the nearby surface will offer stunning reflexions of these formations. Just hold your breath and enjoy! And if you need more look between the roots for blind fish 🙂

Dreams Gate

Depth: 7 meters / 30 feet
Difficulty: Average

Dreamgate requires really good buoyancy skills as it is very shallow and has very low ceiling. Very decorated with delicate formations, make sure you dive close to the line to limit the impact of your bubbles or an unfortunate fin kick. We love the place and want to enjoy it for a long time.

Zapote

Depth: 40 meters / 120 feet
Difficulty: Very difficult

Zapote is one  of the most demanding Cenote dive as it is deep and fairly dark and you will also encounter a sulfide cloud. But most of all it is very rewarding as, out of this cloud, you will face very special formations, in the shape of a bell. Keep in mind that not only they are very surprising but the are still new to science.

Casa Cenote

Depth: 8 meters /  30 feet
Difficulty: Easy

Casa Cenote - Cenote Manati - Tank Ha

Casa Cenote is one of the easiest cenote dive. You will dive directly under the mangroves and get the chance to meet some marine life since the Cenote is directly connected to the ocean. Most of all you will swim across a dense halocline and observe some beautiful lights effects.

 

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Remipedes

Remipedes are blind crustaceans living in coastal aquifers which contain saline groundwater, with populations in almost every ocean basin explored, including in Australia, the Caribbean Sea, and the Atlantic Ocean.

Remipedes are venomous crustaceans, and the only ones of their kind, first discovered in the 1980s. Their name comes from Latin for “oar-footed” because of the beautiful movement of their many pairs of swimming legs.

 

Contact us for some guided cave dives get the chance to observe live remipedes.

And if you want to become a cave diver we will be happy to orientate you through your training.

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Cave Diving Restrictions

Cave Diving Restrictions

In Cave Diving a Restriction is a narrow passage where two divers could not fit side by side or one on top of each other. Learn how to get through during the Full cave training.
A few shots of some minor restrictions put together by my friend and dive buddy while Cave diving in the Cenotes of Mexico

Cave diving in these amazing mexican caves requires proper training. Don’t hesitate to contact us for more information on cave diving training.

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Is Cenote diving for Me?

You are planning a dive trip to the Yucatan Penninsula in Mexico? Then you might have come accross some amazing pictures of the beautiful Cenotes. Once stunned by these pictures you probably want to see it with your own eyes and live the experience.

But this question keeps popping up: is Cenote diving for me?

  • What are Cenotes?

Deep Cave diving in the Cenotes of Yucatan, Mexico
Deep Cave diving in the Cenotes of Yucatan, Mexico

Cenotes are sinkholes distributed all over the Yucatan Peninsula. They are the window to the underwater caves and caverns. And they are one of the main dive attraction in the area and one of the top dive destination in the world.

Those caves are highly decorated with stunning formations such as stalagmites and stalactites which makes them very unique.

Your first Cenote diving experience will probably be a cavern tour. You are not required to have a cave diving certification as you will not be technically entering the cave.

  • What is a cavern dive?

A cavern dive is the exploration of a natural overhead environment while remaining within sight of natural light.

When diving in the Cenotes you will always see natural light and have a sight of a direct way out of the cavern. However do not underestimate safety by thinking it is an easy dive. And here are some thoughts to consider before going for a cavern dive.

  • Will I be swimming in tight places?
Gran Cenote - Cavern diving in Tulum
Gran Cenote – Cavern diving

No you won’t!

It is a requirement for all cavern dive in the Cenotes to go through areas where two divers can fit side by side at all time. You will not swim in any tight areas.

Should any problem arrize you will be able to swim side by side with your guide to exit the cavern.

  • Can accidents happen while Cenote diving?

Yes, it can happen…

Your cavern guide should be a qualified divemaster or instructor in teaching status and a certified cave diver. Of course the more experienced the better the guide can react to a bad situation. And the more he/she knows the site, the better he/she can handle the situation.

Cavern diving by the book, is really safe. The conditions are optimal: shallow dives, no current, great visibility, group size limited to 4 divers maximum per guide and all divers should be experienced.

We recommend you to choose carefully your dive operator or guide. And remember the most experienced the guide the better he/she can show you around and yet commit to safety and conservation.

  • Is it dark down there?

Yes it is!

Safety Rules for Cavern diving in the Cenotes
Basic safety rules

Some parts in the Cenotes are very dark and darkness can alter your sense of orientation, and you a feeling you could get lost easily. This is why everyone is diving with a dive light.

Your guide should be carrying all his/her full cave gear that includes a bright and long lasting primary light used for showing you around and for communication as well as 2 back up lights. And yourself should carry at least one dive light.

The waters in the Cenotes are crystal clear, and will stay that way if all divers follow the basic rules: maintain good buoyancy, swim using non silting kicking techniques and follow the guideline.

  • Will I be able to find my way?

Yes, as long as you follow the Guide Lines

Full Cave Diver course - deploy a guideline
Installing a guideline

One of the main safety rule in cavern diving in the Cenotes is referencing the guideline at all time. Your guide will explain how to identify it, how to use it and where to position yourself at all time. The same guideline will show you the way out. You should also be able to rely on your guide to follow them at all time.

We strongly recommend to dive the Cenotes. It is a unique and magical experience. Always make sure you dive well within your limits and remember the golden rule: anyone can call the dive, at any time, for any reason. So, do not hesitate to do so whenever you don’t feel comfortable.

When comes the time for you to book your dive tour to the Cenotes, remember that safety is important. Cenote diving is for advanced divers and you should be sharp on your dive skills, so don’t hesitate to refresh them by a couple ocean dives before you head for the cenotes.

Enjoy your Cenote dive 🙂

Contact us for some private guiding or personalized group packages: CONTACT

Cenote Kukulkan, cavern dive in the winter morning light
Cenote Kukulkan, cavern dive in the winter morning light
[Source: Museo de la Prehistoria Dos Ojos]

The Pleistocene Starts about 2.6 to 1.8 million years ago (depending on the source consulted) most recent period of glaciation .
In the earth’s history there have been many stages of cooling, during which there are glacial periods  (cold) and interglacial (warmer).
Ice Age refers to the most recent glacial period which began 110.000 years ago, whose greatest influence occurred around 20,000 years ago and ended about 8,000 a.p. This age or era was characterized mainly by the decrease of the temperature, which resulted in the expansion of glaciers, decreased sea levels (about 120 meters) and the freezing of large lakes. As a result, there were substantial changes in terrestrial and marine environments that forced the movement of species runners which had not been available previously.

Picture from: //www.facebook.com/MuseodelaPrehistoriaDosOjos/
Picture from: https://www.facebook.com/MuseodelaPrehistoriaDosOjos/

The Ice Age witnessed two powerful events on the planet: the extinction of the “megafauna”, large mammals that had lived without major concerns for millions of years, and the expansion of a new species from the heart Africa to all continents: Homo sapiens. It is estimated that we left Africa 60.000 years ago, we came to Australia 10.000 years later, then to Europe 35,000 years ago and America 15.000 years ago. Some authors argue that the extinction of large mammals was due to human impact.
The wave of extinctions spread sequentially to Australia, Japan, North America, South America and then in some islands such as Cyprus, the Antilles, New Caledonia, Madagascar and New Zealand.